Ernst Lissauer Hymn Of Hate Analysis Essay

The Still Slamming Door: Relevance Of A Doll’S House In The 21st Century, Hope Morris2018 Olivet Nazarene University

The Still Slamming Door: Relevance Of A Doll’S House In The 21st Century, Hope Morris

Student Scholarship - English

The infamous slamming door at the end of Henrik Ibsen’s A Doll’s House has been controversial from its beginning, leaving audiences with uncertainties about the meaning of family, morality, and personal responsibility. Written in 1879 when the “women’s issue” was still a relatively new subject, the play was met with criticism for its radical female protagonist and her decision to abandon her marriage. In a society where a woman’s primary role was one of domesticity and subservience to her husband, the ending of A Doll’s House was disquieting to audiences. However, Ibsen’s masterpiece remains ...


Dorothy Moser Medlin Papers - Accession 1049, Dorothy Moser Medlin2018 Winthrop University

Dorothy Moser Medlin Papers - Accession 1049, Dorothy Moser Medlin

Manuscript Collection

(The Dorothy Moser Medlin Papers are currently in processing.)

This collection contains most of the records of Dorothy Medlin’s work and correspondence and also includes reference materials, notes, microfilm, photographic negatives related both to her professional and personal life. Additions include a FLES Handbook, co-authored by Dorothy Medlin and a decorative mirror belonging to Dorothy Medlin.

Major series in this collection include: some original 18th century writings and ephemera and primary source material of André Morellet, extensive collection of secondary material on André Morellet's writings and translations, Winthrop related files, literary manuscripts and notes by Dorothy Medlin (1966-2011 ...


The Theoretical Basis And Framework Of Variation Theory, Shunqing Cao, Zhoukun Han2017 Sichuan University

The Theoretical Basis And Framework Of Variation Theory, Shunqing Cao, Zhoukun Han

CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture

In their article "The Theoretical Basis and Framework of Variation Theory" Shunqing Cao and Zhoukun Han re-examine the conclusions on variation theory drawn from Cao's The Variation Theory of Comparative Literature. Drawing on the past three decades of Chinese comparatist practice, the proposal of variation theory in that book is a scientific endeavor from China. China's comparative literature has sustained a focus on comparison of literatures Eastern and Western. And Chinese scholars have long been aware of the heterogeneity of civilizations and the variability in literature exchanges. By demonstrating uses and potentials of variation theory, this thesis attempts ...


Terminology Translation And The "Rebirth" Of Comparative Literature In, Peina Zhuang2017 Sichuan University

Terminology Translation And The "Rebirth" Of Comparative Literature In, Peina Zhuang

CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture

In their article "Terminology Translation and the 'Rebirth' of Comparative Literature in China" Peina Zhuang and Huan Pi discuss terminology translation during the rise of Comparative Literature in China. They argue that, while great headway has been made in Comparative Literature here, it is not free from the challenges inherent in terminology translation, an important part in inter-cultural dialogue. Analyzing the status quo in terminology translation from three aspects, namely, the lack of unity, standardization, and accuracy, they argue that more attention should be given to this aspect in the scholarship. In particular, they advocate more concrete empirical research, such ...


Rebirth Of Comparative Literature In China From The Perspective Of Medio-Translatology, Wei Guo2017 Sichuan University

Rebirth Of Comparative Literature In China From The Perspective Of Medio-Translatology, Wei Guo

CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture

In his article "Rebirth of Comparative Literature in China from the Perspective of Medio-translatology," Wei Guo discusses the "rebirth" of Comparative Literature in China from the development of medio-translatology. He argues that, though translation has received wide attention in Comparative Literature, both domestic and foreign, especially in today's globalized world, the proposition of medio-translatology and systematic investigation by Xie Tianzhen and other Chinese scholars constitute an important way forward for translation in Comparative Literature. It makes translation an independent branch in this discipline, which is conducive to ending the longstanding confusions in translation under medio-translatology and translation studies on ...


Understanding The English Bible: A Comparative Analysis Of Four Bible Versions, Michael R. Coats2017 The University of Southern Mississippi

Understanding The English Bible: A Comparative Analysis Of Four Bible Versions, Michael R. Coats

Honors Theses

Scholarship pertaining to the Bible accounts for a great deal of research. A search for “the Bible” on just the University of Southern Mississippi Libraries website archive results in 549,075 hits, and specifying “English Bible versions” only reduces those results to 70,000. My largest difficulty in discussing the Bible lies not in finding a conversation but in finding which part of the conversation to enter. In the past fifty years, one of the largest emphases has been on using the best translation style for the Bible, a topic that has dominated the field of biblical scholarship (Ryken, Understanding ...


Cultural Re-Presentation And Translation : Chinese And English Anthologies Of Tang Poetry, Chi Man, Cecilia CHAN2017 Lingnan University

Cultural Re-Presentation And Translation : Chinese And English Anthologies Of Tang Poetry, Chi Man, Cecilia Chan

Theses & Dissertations

Due to its unique prestige, classical Chinese poetry written during the Tang dynasty is often anthologised. These anthologies serve various purposes (e.g. recreational, educational, or both), but they are generally expected to feature works high in aesthetic value, and represent the culture wherein they are produced. While the functions of anthologies are seldom contested, representations of Tang poetry in anthologies have many different manifestations.

Using China’s most famous anthology, Tangshi sanbaishou 唐詩三百首, as an opening case study, research shows that within its home culture, the anthologising of Tang poetry has a long history by itself, and anthologists negotiate ...


China And The Politics Of Cross–Cultural Representation In Interwar European Fiction, Carles Prado-Fonts2017 Universitat Oberta de Catalunya

China And The Politics Of Cross–Cultural Representation In Interwar European Fiction, Carles Prado-Fonts

CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture

In his article "China and the Politics of Cross–Cultural Representation in Interwar European Fiction" Carles Prado-Fonts analyzes Joan Crespi's La ciutat de la por (The City of Fear, 1930) to illustrate the varied representations of China in interwar Europe. In the 1920s and 1930s, a plurality of views on China and the Chinese people became widespread across different parts of Europe, mainly shaped by English, French, and German representations. Contradictory images of China coexisted in literature, thought, and popular culture. Crespi's work exemplifies these contradictions: China appears as both an attainable reality and an unreachable fantasy, two ...


Elogio Del Amateur: Traducción Y Resistencia En La Era Del Panamericanismo (Ee.Uu. 1889-1945), Maria Soledad Marambio Castro2017 The Graduate Center, City University of New York

Elogio Del Amateur: Traducción Y Resistencia En La Era Del Panamericanismo (Ee.Uu. 1889-1945), Maria Soledad Marambio Castro

All Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

My dissertation explores the notion of amateurism in the context of the translation of Latin American literature in the U.S. at the beginning of the 20th century. I argue that all literary translators are amateurs in terms of their modes of production, and that this condition allows them to resist the hegemonic projects of their day (In this dissertation, “amateurism” does away with the pejorative connotation that the term has acquired in the common use). With this in mind, I study the work and the career path of two American translators, Alice Stone Blackwell and Isaac Goldberg, and ...


Agency And Political Engagement In Gide And Barrault's Post-War Theatrical Adaptation Of Kafka's The Trial, Yevgenya Strakovsky2017 Stanford University

Agency And Political Engagement In Gide And Barrault's Post-War Theatrical Adaptation Of Kafka's The Trial, Yevgenya Strakovsky

CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture

In her article, "Agency and Political Engagement in Gide and Barrault's Post-war Theatrical Adaptation of Kafka's The Trial" Yevgenya Strakovsky considers the political themes of André Gide and Jean-Louis Barrault's Le Procès (The Trial, 1947), the first theatrical adaptation of Franz Kafka's Der Prozess (The Trial, 1914). Strakovsky demonstrates that Le Procès, written and staged in the immediate aftermath of World War II, levels a critique against the passive complicity of citizens in unjust persecution in both its script and its staging. The paper also considers the elements of Kafka's prose that lend themselves to ...


两次鸦片战争期间中英交涉中口译者的主体性和能动性(1840-1842,1856-1860), Zhen YUAN2017 Lingnan University

两次鸦片战争期间中英交涉中口译者的主体性和能动性(1840-1842,1856-1860), Zhen Yuan

Theses & Dissertations

两次鸦片战争期间(1840-1842,1856-1860),中英两国正式开启了官方交涉活动与外交谈判。在这些交涉活动中,双方口译者均发挥了重要作用,展现了特有的主体性和能动性。本文拟对当时较具代表性的三位口译者进行个案研究,他们分别是中国译者鲍鹏、黄仲畬和英国译者马儒翰。笔者通过挖掘相关的一手、二手资料,并对它们进行缜密的文本分析,试图对三位译者在各自的外交口译中所体现的主体性和能动性作出详尽的考证和论述。本文得出的结论是:在两次鸦片战争的特殊情境中,口译者往往背离“忠实性”原则:有的受到自身生活或工作经历之影响,在口译活动中常带入自己的主观想法,独立做出决定,此可谓口译者主体性的表现形式;有的采取跨界策略,在交涉双方不同立场和态度之间游移,以达到斡旋和协调的目的,充分体现了口译者的能动性。


Colombian Readings Of Paradise Lost: Gabriel García Márquez’S Literary Conversation With John Milton, Daniela M. Maestre, Angelica Duran2017 University of Los Andes, Colombia

Colombian Readings Of Paradise Lost: Gabriel García Márquez’S Literary Conversation With John Milton, Daniela M. Maestre, Angelica Duran

The Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship (SURF) Symposium

Englishman John Milton’s epic poem Paradise Lost has twenty European Spanish translations. Despite the high number of translations, three Latin American writers, one Mexican and two Colombians published three more versions. Our project seeks to discover what motivated the Colombian translators to publish more versions of Paradise Lost, as part of the influence of Milton’s works in Colombian literature in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. There is little information about Colombian readings of this epic poem: we do not yet know how Colombians read the epic poem and why. To get a better sense of Colombian reception of ...


Differentiating Averroes’ Accounts Of The Metaphysics Of Human Epistemology In His Middle And Long Commentaries On Aristotle’S De Anima, Caleb H A Brown2017 Liberty University

Differentiating Averroes’ Accounts Of The Metaphysics Of Human Epistemology In His Middle And Long Commentaries On Aristotle’S De Anima, Caleb H A Brown

Montview Liberty University Journal of Undergraduate Research

Averroes (an Islamic Andalusian philosopher in the 12th century) discusses the metaphysics of human epistemology extensively, and his socio-religious context sheds light on this discussion. Several of his works, most prominently his three commentaries on Aristotle’s De Anima, attempt to explain how finite, particular minds interact with universal, eternal intelligibles. Current scholarship focuses on the two longer commentaries, the Middle Commentary and the Long Commentary, but there is no consensus regarding which of these presents Averroes’ final articulation of the metaphysics of human epistemology. Those who maintain that Averroes wrote the Middle Commentary last tend to minimize the ...


“A Few Bars Of The Hymn Of Hate”: The Reception Of Ernst Lissauer’S “Haßgesang Gegen England” In German And English, Richard Millington, Roger Smith2017 Victoria University of Wellington

“A Few Bars Of The Hymn Of Hate”: The Reception Of Ernst Lissauer’S “Haßgesang Gegen England” In German And English, Richard Millington, Roger Smith

Studies in 20th & 21st Century Literature

“The poem fell like a shell into a munitions depot”: with these words Stefan Zweig recalled the impact made by Ernst Lissauer’s Anglophobic poem “Haßgesang gegen England” (A Chant of Hate Against England) upon first publication in August 1914. The poem’s success derived from the rhetorical power with which it encapsulated a national emotional response to the outbreak of war. In Germany it initiated an outpouring of Anglophobic verse, but lost favor as it became clear that the patriotism it epitomized would not carry the Central Powers to a swift victory. Even after its disappearance from public attention ...


Code-Switching In Anzaldúa's Borderlands/La Frontera And Walcott’S Omeros: A Literary Device For “New Readability”, Anastasia Lakhtikova2017 University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

Code-Switching In Anzaldúa's Borderlands/La Frontera And Walcott’S Omeros: A Literary Device For “New Readability”, Anastasia Lakhtikova

Poroi

No abstract provided.


The Stories We Tell, Abigail A. Hoekstra2017 James Madison University

The Stories We Tell, Abigail A. Hoekstra

MAD-RUSH Undergraduate Research Conference

Two or Three Things I Know for Sure tells the story of Dorothy Allison as she comes to terms with her past and strives to move beyond it, to be empowered and embodied by it. In this short memoir, Allison explores the relationship she has with her mother and how that relationship has influenced her individuality and character, whose complacency has restricted Allison. Allison breaks away from the stories she has been told to tell a new story of abuse and disembodiment in which she finds love, and in turn, embodiment; the unification of her body and spirit. Story-telling and ...


Una Traducción Dúctil: El Beso De La Mujer Araña Y Los Códigos Artificiales, Sam McCracken2017 Georgia State University

Una Traducción Dúctil: El Beso De La Mujer Araña Y Los Códigos Artificiales, Sam Mccracken

Georgia State Undergraduate Research Conference

No abstract provided.


Tolkien, Eucatastrophe, And The Re-Creation Of Medieval Legend, Jane Beal PhD2017 University of California, Davis

Tolkien, Eucatastrophe, And The Re-Creation Of Medieval Legend, Jane Beal Phd

Journal of Tolkien Research

Using comparative literary analysis, this essay examines three case studies from J.R.R. Tolkien’s oeuvre, in which Tolkien practiced eucatastrophic rewriting: his folk-tale, “Sellic Spell,” in which he re-creates the Old English poem Beowulf; his poem, “Princess Mee,” in which he re-envisions aspects of the myth of Narcissus and the Middle English dream vision poem, Pearl; and the character of Éowyn from TheLord of the Rings, in which he re-imagines the fate of Brynhild, a shield-maiden and valkyrie from Norse legend. In each case, Tolkien rewrites the original so that sorrow is transformed into happiness in Tolkien ...


Landay As The Voice Of Pashtun Women's Passion And Social Life, Fahim Rahimi2017 Nangarhar University

Landay As The Voice Of Pashtun Women's Passion And Social Life, Fahim Rahimi

Journal of Research Initiatives

This paper explores Landay a form of folk poetry and consist of couplets; the first one consists of nine syllables and the second thirteen. This format of poetry is described by some to consist of one and one half verses. The author of such couplets is generally unknown. Some of them have names of authors or national figures and heroes attached.

In the study of a society various aspects of society can be discussed like historical background, cultural elements, cultural heritage, which are main points of a society. Furthermore, it gives importance to fundamental values and customs along with life ...


Notes On Contributors, 2017 Western Michigan University

Notes On Contributors

Transference

No abstract provided.



"May God Punish England"-- John Bull bribes the Devil
The previous post featured the Belgian poem “New Year’s Wishes to the German Army,” which inflamed support for the First World War and cursed the German soldiers.  However, the most famous hate-the-enemy, nationalistic poem of the war was written by Ernst Lissauer, a German-Jewish poet.  His “Hymn of Hate” was composed shortly after war broke out in 1914, and in just a few short months, it was translated and published in the United States (then a neutral nation). The New York Times admired Lissauer’s technical skill, but described the poem as “simply abominable,” and “a brutal and wicked production.”* In Germany, not surprisingly, the poem was an immediate success.  The Kaiser honored Lissauer, and the Crown Prince of Bavaria ordered that the poem be printed and distributed to his troops. 

Hymn of Hate

German poster with sword thrust into Britain
French and Russian, they matter not,
A blow for a blow and a shot for a shot!
We love them not, we hate them not,
We hold the Weichsel and Vosges gate.
We have but one and only hate,
We love as one, we hate as one,
We have one foe and one alone.
He is known to you all, he is known to you all,
He crouches behind the dark gray flood,
Full of envy, of rage, of craft, of gall,
Cut off by waves that are thicker than blood.
Come, let us stand at the Judgment Place,
An oath to swear to, face to face,
An oath of bronze no wind can shake,
An oath for our sons and their sons to take.
Come, hear the word, repeat the word,
Throughout the Fatherland make it heard.
We will never forego our hate,
We have all but a single hate,
We love as one, we hate as one,
We have one foe and one alone —

ENGLAND!


In the Captain's Mess, in the banquet hall,
Sat feasting the officers, one and all,
Like a sabre blow, like the swing of a sail,
One seized his glass and held high to hail;
Sharp-snapped like the stroke of a rudder's play,
Spoke three words only: "To the Day!"
Whose glass this fate?
They had all but a single hate.
Who was thus known?
They had one foe and one alone--

ENGLAND!

Take you the folk of the Earth in pay,
With bars of gold your ramparts lay,
Bedeck the ocean with bow on bow,
Ye reckon well, but not well enough now.
French and Russian, they matter not,
A blow for a blow, a shot for a shot,
We fight the battle with bronze and steel,
And the time that is coming Peace will seal.
You we will hate with a lasting hate,
We will never forego our hate,
Hate by water and hate by land,
Hate of the head and hate of the hand,
Hate of the hammer and hate of the crown,
Hate of seventy millions choking down.
We love as one, we hate as one,
We have one foe and one alone--
ENGLAND!

(Here is the text of the poem in German.) 


Unlike Cammaerts’ “New Year’s Wishes to the German Army,” this poem doesn’t focus on the harm it wishes to the enemy or the specific tortures it wishes to inflict on opposing troops.  Instead, the repeated We is the focus of the poem, as Germans join together in song, feasts, and toasts to vow their common hatred of ENGLAND!  The British are mocked as cowards who crouch behind the “dark grey flood” of the English Channel, and Germany's shared sense of outrage at England's perceived betrayal fosters German unity: “We love as one, we hate as one.” The German loathing for England inspires battle zeal as they “fight the battle with bronze and steel.” While the poem is titled as a hymn, its sentiment seems nearer to a rousing drinking song, and it’s easy to imagine with that a few editorial changes, it could work as a modern sports anthem. 


Curiously, the poem became almost as popular in England as in Germany.  Lissauer, who had also coined the German Army’s slogan “Gott Strafe England” (may God punish England), could not have anticipated that the British would view his war slogan as a compliment, nor that the British would find a great deal of amusement in parodying his “Hymn of Hate.” Newspapers in England published the text of the poem with an accompanying musical score, and the choir at the Royal College of Music performed it as a joke.  A review of the performance noted that although the 100-member British choir was instructed to sing “with plenty of snarl,” their laughter made this difficult, and “when they came to the word England, they rolled it out in fine style.” 


Lissauer himself grew to regret writing the poem.  In 1926, he wrote that instead of writing a poem of hatred against England, he should have written a poem of love for Germany.  In the years following World War I, Germany, the country he so loved, rejected him as a Jew and accused him of “fanatical hatred” that was “utterly un-German” and “characteristic of nothing so much as the Jewish race.” Tragically, the hatred that inspired his poem did not end with the First World War. 

1915 news article
 *This and other historical information on the poem and its author can be found in the 1987 History Today article by C.C. Aronsfeld, “Ernst Lissauer and the Hymn of Hate.” 

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